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Can I Get A Waiver Of Deportation?



When you have received a notice that you may be deported, the experience can be frightening. You can call an immigration lawyer to guide you through the process and defend you in a court of law. Just because you have received a notice does not mean that you will automatically be deported. A judge may consider the specific facts of your case to determine that you may continue to reside in the United States. In 2011, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security reported that only 20 percent of all repeat immigration violators were actually deported after receiving notice. You can avoid being deported by hiring experienced immigration lawyers to advocate for you in front of a judge.

Waiver Of Deportation

An immigration attorney may be able to obtain permanent resident status for you. If you have received a notice for deportation, an attorney may be able to obtain permanent resident status for you if you have not been convicted of an aggravated felony. Here are a few other examples of situations that will allow an immigrant to receive a waiver of deportation:

  • An immigrant has resided in the United States for at least seven years.
  • An immigrant does not have any issues with Homeland Security.
  • One has family ties in the United States.
  • One owns property or does business in the United States.
  • One has good moral character.

Negative Factors For Waiver Of Deportation

If you have a criminal past, then you will likely not be able to quality for waiver of deportation. An immigration attorney will have to represent you in court to explain the extenuating circumstances of your case. If there is any evidence of bad character that exists, then this may also weigh against you in court. Also, if you have violated immigration laws in the past, then this may also weigh against you in a court of law. You can meet with an immigration lawyer to develop a strategy for handling your waiver of deportation. An immigration lawyer will attempt to emphasize the most positive aspects of your case in front of a judge and jury.