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District Of Columbia Divorce



To begin a divorce proceeding in Washington, D.C., either spouse must be a resident of Washington, D.C., for at least six months prior to filing for divorce. (Members of the military stationed in the District of Columbia must also live there for six months before a divorce filing.)

Grounds for Divorce in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., allows for divorce if the couple have mutually and voluntarily lived apart for six months prior to filing for divorce or have lived apart for a year prior to the divorce. The divorcing couple needs to show that the marriage has broken down and cannot be saved.

Your Washington, D.C., divorce attorney can help ensure you meet the legal requirements to file for a divorce in Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., Property Division & Spousal Maintenance

In Washington, D.C., the assets and property a couple acquires during their marriage will be divided "equitably" though this does not always mean it will be divided equally. Assets and property that each person owned prior to the marriage and that were kept separate from the couple's joint assets will remain the property of the original owner after a divorce.

Under certain conditions, the court will order alimony (also known as spousal support or maintenance) to be paid from one spouse to the other. The length and amount of support awarded depends on several factors, including the length of the marriage and each spouse's financial situation and earning capacity.

Your Washington, D.C., divorce lawyer can help negotiate a fair division of property and alimony agreement, if necessary.

Washington, D.C., Child Custody & Child Support

Washington, D.C., law requires that the court make custody decisions based on what is in the best interests of the child. Washington, D.C., courts will consider joint custody if it is in the best interests of the child. Generally, a parent who is not awarded custody is granted visitation rights.

In Washington, D.C., child support is calculated based on the combined gross income of the parents and how many children are being supported. After the court has ruled on child support, the paying parent can make online payments through the Child Support Services Division. The child support is then paid to the other parent.

Additional Washington, D.C., Divorce Resources

Lawyers.com's information about divorce in Washington, D.C.

District of Columbia Division VIII, Domestic Relations, Title 46

Superior Court of D.C., Domestic Relations Branch

Washington, D.C., child support calculator